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Posts Tagged ‘women’s hockey’

Here is a very unofficial list of the Top 10 moments in Cobbers sports from the 2011-12 season. It was compiled by the Concordia Sports Information Department and will most likely exclude some player/coach or team success. The list is only a way for Cobber fans to relive the great year in Cobber athletics and is in no way a official comprehensive summary of all the great things that happened during the 2011-12 athletic season.


No. 2– The No.2 top story on the Cobber top 10 stories list might spotlights the team that went the farthest in the NCAA Tournament last year. The Cobber women’s hockey went from Antarctica on the national hockey scene to the middle of downtown New York as they finished the year as one of the top 8 teams in the country.
Cobber Women's Hockey team
Concordia was picked to finish fourth in the preseason coaches’ poll but then went on to prove everyone wrong by winning 10 conference games, advancing to the championship of the MIAC Tournament, earning their first-ever national ranking and then getting the program’s first-ever spot in the national playoffs.

The reason we chose the women’s hockey team above all the other great Cobber teams last year because all their achievements were program firsts. It might be a knock against the women’s soccer and volleyball teams that they always get into the playoffs but there is never another national tournament “first”. That, combined with the fact that only eight teams make the national tournament, propelled the women’s hockey team to the No.2 spot on the list.

Concordia finished the year with a 15-5-5 overall record which marked the second straight year they won a program-record 15 overall games. The Cobbers also finished the year by being ranked ninth in the final USCHO.com national poll. Second-year head coach Brett Bruininks was named the MIAC Coach of the Year and five different CC players earned All-Conference honors. On top of that, senior Katelyn Dold went on to become the first All-American in program history.

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